To Passau for the Second Movement of the Blue Danube

In the initial post about our trip along the Danube, I said that the Rhine landscape featured a large number of castles While this is undeniably true, it may have been misconstrued to imply that the landscape of the Danube did not.

So let me clearly state once and for all that this would be a totally false impression. Of course the Donau has castles, too. And just to prove the point, today

To Passau for the Second Movement of the Blue Danube

Regensburg, Why Have You Got a Heart of Stone?

Considering we have sung the praises of Regensburg in our last post, it seems all the more unforgivable that we failed to mention the city’s key asset on the central European tourism market: the fact that its entire (and fairly substantial) Old Town has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. You are forgiven to ask, how come, that a medium-sized city in provincial Germany of which until now you had heard little, was found

Regensburg, Why Have You Got a Heart of Stone?

Prelude to a Blue Danube Dream

Alone among European countries, Germany can claim sections of both the Rhine and the Danube, Europe’s most storied rivers. Most of you will have been aware of that, of course, but here is something that may surprise you: the German sections of both rivers are of a roughly similar length (865 km for the Rhine, 687 km for the Danube), and of the 10 countries that the Danube passes through on her

Prelude to a Blue Danube Dream

Care for a “Sculptour” in a Modern Art Hotspot?

Münster is one of western Germany’s most favourite day trip destinations and also happens to be a modern art hotspot. People from the region and beyond like to come here partly to experience the town’s ancient and interesting history: in 1535, the Siege of Münster ended the tyrannical regime of the eccentric Jan van Leiden, a sort of medieval Pol Pot, and in 1648, this was where the Peace of Westphalia was

Care for a “Sculptour” in a Modern Art Hotspot?

A Japanese Garden in Duesseldorf

8000 Japanese citizens live in the German city of Düsseldorf and they built a little colony complete with a Japanese Garden in Duesseldorfproviding middle and upper management people of Japanese companies in the city with their home comforts with Japanese shops and Japanese restaurants. There is probably no other place in Europe where you find such a wide array of excellent Japanese eateries.

A Japanese Garden in Duesseldorf

Have You Seen the Roadside Shrines of Northwest Germany?

Catholicism, in theory, is the same all over the world In reality, however, its practices are as different as a village in rural Germany is from Rio de Janeiro. Catholicism is probably best thought of as an abstract concept like “art” or “music” – certain basic rules are the same, but everybody creates something distinct and different out of them, guided by even older, underlying customs and traditions.

In this process, almost every

Have You Seen the Roadside Shrines of Northwest Germany?

When Will the Twain Meet Between New East and Old West?

… and when the twain finally did meet, two worlds collided – and two rival viewpoints of history Two trillion dollars have been spent. This is not a trifling amount, even for one of the world’s richest nations. Still, East Germany – after 25 years of reconstruction – has preserved an Eastness about it which is not easy to define but easy to recognize, even by people who do not know Germany all that well.

When Will the Twain Meet Between New East and Old West?

Take a Look at the Picturesque White Cliffs of Ruegen

As seen on an iconic, world-famous painting – and by Kaiser Bill’s mother Ruegen is Germany’s largest island and one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations.

Unsurprisingly, considering the German love for hiking, Ruegen also has a dense network of hiking paths, all centred on the 140 km long Hauptwanderweg – the “main hiking path” – from Kap Ankona in the north to the southern ferry harbour of Altefähr.

This

Take a Look at the Picturesque White Cliffs of Ruegen

See Why You’ll Agree that Scenic Binz Means Beach

Scenic landscapes and a historical monument on the beach promenade of Rügen, Germany’s largest island It may be a truth universally acknowledged (at least across that section of the universe where English is spoken) that Binz Means Heinz. But in modern Germany, Binz means beach. It has always stood for sandy beaches and seaside fun – at least since Binz became one of the busiest and most popular holiday resorts on the country’s Baltic coast.

See Why You’ll Agree that Scenic Binz Means Beach

Spotlight on Stralsund as Gateway to Ruegen and Usedom

The German city of Stralsund is the gateway to Ruegen and Usedom in the Baltic Sea… …. and before you set out for a hiking trip on either of these two fascinating islands, you should take the time to explore what is in many ways the most interesting of the great German Baltic sea ports. Spotlight on Stralsund

We used Stralsund as a base for our stay in the area, and here are

Spotlight on Stralsund as Gateway to Ruegen and Usedom