In Search of the Scary Ghosts of London

Some people travel to England to learn English, to do business, to watch a West End play or a football game. Others travel to Britain to meet a ghost. Don’t laugh: this is big business. Owners of castles try to lure overseas visitors with a promise of a meeting with their dead ancestors, stately homes offer Ghost Hunts, and there is a host of specialized providers who can arrange a trip for you through various

In Search of the Scary Ghosts of London

Roman Walls, Cricket and a Poem – Three for One in Chichester

Chichester: Roman Walls, Cricket’s Babe Ruth and Philip Larkin I normally shy away from dishing out general travel advice, but here is one: rather than picking your destinations according to fashion and the dictates of the travel press, base your choice on expedience and opportunity.

If someone, for example, invites you for a job interview in a town or an area where you have never been, not only accept but also read about

Roman Walls, Cricket and a Poem – Three for One in Chichester

The Rings of Saturn on the Seafront of the Suffolk Coast

Today’s post sets out to prove that, no matter how gloomy and unpromising the area (and the weather) may look, you can still have fun. Just put on your walking shoes and a raincoat – an extra layer of clothes if it’s cold – and go out for a hike or even a brief walk. Brace the wind and fill your lungs with some fresh air! You will be surprised how good that feels. As

The Rings of Saturn on the Seafront of the Suffolk Coast

Rediscovering the Greatest Literary Work About Hiking

W. G. Sebald and East Anglia The Rings Of Saturn is the greatest literary work about hiking. The book deals – as you may suspect – not only with hiking but with a great many other things besides, but its central conceit is a long walk that the author undertakes along the coast of East Anglia, the peninsula north of London and Cambridge in eastern England.

If you have never

Rediscovering the Greatest Literary Work About Hiking

See Why Wimbledon Is Not Just About Tennis

Wimbledon is possibly the most famous of all London suburbs, and if you now ask “famous for what?”, I hereby grant you permission to leave and read something else, because much in this article will be of no interest to you whatsoever. Having said that, Wimbledon is not all about lawn tennis: it features two rather splendid parks, one near-wild and the other with a landscaping tradition that goes back all the way to Capability

See Why Wimbledon Is Not Just About Tennis

Scared to Meet Ghosts of the Undead of London?

Themed Walk in London Many of the city’s restless souls have chosen to reside in the tomb-like tunnels of the underground railway The most popular Themed London Walks deal with one of the following: Jack the Ripper (been there), pop music (done that), and ghosts – more of which soon.

But please don’t be impatient: you will meet them soon enough. Some of these restless spirits have been haunting the capital’s streets, pubs

Scared to Meet Ghosts of the Undead of London?

The Pleasant Unexpected in Thirty Minutes in Kingsbridge

Just a reminder that it is the “kindness of strangers” which makes it all worth while When does the hiking season begin? That depends very much on local specifics, on things like altitude and latitude: the weather, quite simply, but the season ends pretty much everywhere on the same date, and that’s when the clocks go back.

From one day to another, you will find that the available daylight hours have dramatically shrunk

The Pleasant Unexpected in Thirty Minutes in Kingsbridge

Walking London: Top Borough Enfield

Walks in London A walk through London’s northernmost suburb gives you a chance to reconnect with outer London’s semi-rural past

Enfield was once a key section of the English home county that no longer exists: Middlesex, now only a memory and the name of a cricket club, was gobbled up some time ago by the growth of Greater London, even more so than the neighbouring counties of Essex and Sussex.

Walking London: Top Borough Enfield

A Post (Partly) Written Beneath an Elm in the Churchyard at Harrow

Today, we follow in the footsteps of Byron and Churchill – and the skid marks of the world’s first fatal car accident

Today’s post is the first in an intermittent series of walks through London’s outer boroughs and suburbs. Those who do not know or understand London may be surprised to find out how much there is to explore: some of these places have preserved much of their village-like origins and rural

A Post (Partly) Written Beneath an Elm in the Churchyard at Harrow

Bleak House on a Bleak Landscape

The most famous building in Dartmoor National Park is not open for visitors On our last afternoon in Dartmoor National Park, we made a trip to the highland moors.

We could not go hiking anymore, there was no time left for that, but better a cursory view than no view at all, so we took the 98 bus from Tavistock to the village of Princetown which sits pretty much in

Bleak House on a Bleak Landscape